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Thread: Antialiasing/Anisotropic Filtering

  1. #31
    Ignotium
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gutter View Post
    devs?....anything?

    How about some feedback?
    too busy doing.... ehrm... something i guess.

    @Phopojijo
    Head to gamespot and watch the screenies they have of forced AA in Bioshock, and then come again and rain some more knowledge to me/us

  2. #32
    faultymoose
    Guest
    FYI, HDR isn't an effect, it refers to pixel illuminance values higher than 1, or basically pixels that go from black (darkness), to white (say, a piece of paper), to 'super white' (the sun). What developers do with HDR is the effect, and sometimes it's not so nice. Subtle is usually the best choice.

    If you're referring to bloom, that's just one small effect. Simulating an aperture effect (entering or exiting dark/light areas and seeing the contrast readjust), as well as extremely realistic reflections are other advantages of HDR.

    Anyway, as I said, just an FYI.

  3. #33
    gutter
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by faultymoose View Post
    FYI, HDR isn't an effect, it refers to pixel illuminance values higher than 1, or basically pixels that go from black (darkness), to white (say, a piece of paper), to 'super white' (the sun). What developers do with HDR is the effect, and sometimes it's not so nice. Subtle is usually the best choice.

    If you're referring to bloom, that's just one small effect. Simulating an aperture effect (entering or exiting dark/light areas and seeing the contrast readjust), as well as extremely realistic reflections are other advantages of HDR.

    Anyway, as I said, just an FYI.
    Oh no. Not another one.

    Thanks for your definition of what HDR and Bloom are, but you are wrong about one thing. High Dynamic Range lighting is a visual "effect". Anything that alters the visuals for better or worse and are intentional, can be considered an effect. You are thinking that "effect" is a side-effect. That's not what I am referring to.

    Regardless, these "effects" have nothing to do with the topic.

    WILL I BE ABLE TO FORCE AA WITH A NVIDIA 8 SERIES CARD IN WIN XP?

  4. #34
    Phopojijo
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gutter View Post
    Oh no. Not another one.

    Thanks for your definition of what HDR and Bloom are, but you are wrong about one thing. High Dynamic Range lighting is a visual "effect". Anything that alters the visuals for better or worse and are intentional, can be considered an effect. You are thinking that "effect" is a side-effect. That's not what I am referring to.

    Regardless, these "effects" have nothing to do with the topic.

    WILL I BE ABLE TO FORCE AA WITH A NVIDIA 8 SERIES CARD IN WIN XP?
    No you will not.

    Want more proof then?

    Interview with Tim Sweeney, Lead Programmer and CEO of Epic Games

    Q. Recently you spoke of Unreal Tournament 3 (UT3) using DirectX 10 rendering features. How will this differ from the DirectX 9.0 graphical effects, is this just for a speed increase? How is the geometry shader being used with DirectX 10 hardware and UT3?

    A. We’re primarily using DirectX 10 to improve rendering performance on Windows Vista. The most significant benefit is that, on Vista, DirectX 10 enables us to use video memory more efficiently than DirectX 9 and thus use higher-res textures.

    The most visible DirectX 10-exclusive feature is support for MSAA on high-end video cards. Once you max out the resolution your monitor supports natively, antialiasing becomes the key to achieving higher quality visuals.

    Q. Does Unreal Tournament 3 support HDR rendering with Anti-aliasing?

    A. Yes, on Windows Vista. On all PC platforms, we support running with 16-bit-per-component frame buffer (64 bits total). MSAA anti-aliasing support is only enabled on DirectX 10, because the deferred rendering techniques used by the engine require some capabilities not included in DirectX 9.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ignotium View Post
    too busy doing.... ehrm... something i guess.

    @Phopojijo
    Head to gamespot and watch the screenies they have of forced AA in Bioshock, and then come again and rain some more knowledge to me/us
    I did:

    I posted 1 of them repetitively because it best illustrates where the hack fails: Here it is again for those who have yet to see it.

    It fails during Antialiasing between very-different intensity objects... such as the bright light on a night-lit wall.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pse View Post
    Actually, Source can handle AA + HDR concurrently even on PS2.0 cards. Valve's implementation of HDR is somewhat different to most out there, I believe. Are you sure your nVidia card doesn't support it? (old ATI card here and it works).
    It wasn't a Valve fix, it was an ATI fix. Also -- if you run an ATI card on UnrealEngine3 it will not antialias HDR properly either.

    Valve's HDR implementation was at very low bittage and therefore didn't need to use deferred rendering... and therefore could be antialiased. Real HDR implementations use 64bit color (typically) which cannot work with ATI's hack-fix.

    Quote Originally Posted by MuLuNGuS View Post
    the lack of "AA" has nothing to do with "HDRR"(High Definition Range-Rendering)!
    DX9 can show AA and HDRR together fine, only the GeForce 7xxx generation gfx cards can not show AA and HDRR at the same time.

    the lack of AA in UE3 and DX9 is because UE3 uses a technic called "deferred shading", it's like a subset of the stuff a "deferred renderer" uses.

    the x-ray engine that Stalker uses is a "deferred renderer" that means Stalker + DX9 = no AA, same goes to the UE3.

    ok, there are tricks to activate AA under DX9, but sometimes ther are some flaws.
    You're actually right.

    ATI made HDR+AA work in DirectX9 -- the problem is it was very low bitage HDR (which defeats the purpose for some more advanced applications of HDR).

    64-bit FP HDR (which is what I was referring to) requires Deferred Rendering... which is where AA breaks down. So -- you're right, but when we refer to HDR we typically mean 64FP HDR... which again means Deferred Rendering.

    Lower bittage HDR just isn't high enough precision for applications Epic wanted to use HDR for.

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