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Smood
08-04-2005, 03:47 PM
Just curious, but anyone know how much a Unreal Engine 3 license costs? I imagine it is probablly in the 7 figure range without royalty considering UE2 is $750,000.

Kr4zed
08-04-2005, 04:26 PM
It's almost hard to believe that even with this price tag quite a few companies are better off licensing UE3 than creating their own technology, isn't it? :)

legacy-TheRealPlayer
08-04-2005, 04:31 PM
Crap, I thought it was only 300k o.o

Boksha
08-04-2005, 04:37 PM
Originally posted by TheRealPlayer
Crap, I thought it was only 300k o.o IIRC the UE2 was, but there are different packages you can buy. Generally the more expensive the package you buy, the more support you get from Epic. The idea is with the cheapest package you just buy the rights to use the engine and get the full source code to play with and a few hours of support from Epic, and with the most expensive package they're practically always available to answer any questions you might have.

Angel_Mapper
08-04-2005, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by Kr4zed
It's almost hard to believe that even with this price tag quite a few companies are better off licensing UE3 than creating their own technology, isn't it? :) Not really, the cost in terms of time and programmers (4 programmers at 3 years would cost about that much) is much greater.

Originally posted by Boksha
IIRC the UE2 was, but there are different packages you can buy. Generally the more expensive the package you buy, the more support you get from Epic. The idea is with the cheapest package you just buy the rights to use the engine and get the full source code to play with and a few hours of support from Epic, and with the most expensive package they're practically always available to answer any questions you might have. afaik it has to do with royalites, if you pay the $350,000 price you have to pay royalties to Epic, but with the full $750,000 tag you don't. You get the same amount of support and source code either way.

legacy-AgentZero
08-04-2005, 04:52 PM
"Extremely affordable":D , thats what Epic said on some PS3 meeting (IIRC).

Boksha
08-04-2005, 05:00 PM
Originally posted by Angel_Mapper
afaik it has to do with royalites, if you pay the $350,000 price you have to pay royalties to Epic, but with the full $750,000 tag you don't. You get the same amount of support and source code either way. Could be, it's been a while since I last saw anything about different packages.

legacy-NiTrOcALyPsE
08-04-2005, 07:30 PM
Originally posted by Angel_Mapper
afaik it has to do with royalites, if you pay the $350,000 price you have to pay royalties to Epic, but with the full $750,000 tag you don't. You get the same amount of support and source code either way.

That's how I remember it, although I probably heard it from you in the first place.

legacy-eon5
08-04-2005, 10:19 PM
Reality engine was cheap and better... but Epic bought it :sour:

Smood
08-04-2005, 10:48 PM
Originally posted by eon5
Reality engine was cheap and better... but Epic bought it :sour:

Better in what way?



BTW: Ya angelmapper is right. The couple of hours of support theory is a bit retarded no?

legacy-AgentZero
08-04-2005, 11:22 PM
Originally posted by eon5
Reality engine was cheap and better... but Epic bought it :sour: \o/

legacy-XopePoquar
08-05-2005, 12:40 AM
*Pinky goes to mouth*

One hundred, billion dollars.

legacy-Zentak
08-05-2005, 05:33 AM
Originally posted by AgentZero
"Extremely affordable":D , thats what Epic said on some PS3 meeting (IIRC).
They could be dropping the "no royalties" option and lower the cost for the basic offer.
That would be more affordable for small devs even if that means less profit from a sold game.

mmm i really need to stop using the conditionnal all the time

Boksha
08-05-2005, 05:45 AM
Originally posted by Smood
BTW: Ya angelmapper is right. The couple of hours of support theory is a bit retarded no? Actually I'm pretty sure there has been an engine where the price of the package bought influenced the amount of support you got with it. Could've been the UE1 or the Serious Sam engine, not sure.

Jezza101
08-05-2005, 06:11 AM
sounds like a bargin to me, Ill take 2!

fuegerstef
08-05-2005, 06:33 AM
Originally posted by Jezza101
sounds like a bargin to me, Ill take 2!

THe problem is, they don'T license it to everyone.

You have to have experience in the game industry or at least show that you can do good stuff with it. (This info is also 12 months old, don't know if they had changed it)


So you have to do a DM-Substracted CubewithblurredTextures-1338-clanedition-105-ut2 map first

legacy-aTourist
08-05-2005, 01:26 PM
I think I accidentally made a DM-SubstractedCube-Wireframe.ut2 once, would that do?

fuegerstef
08-05-2005, 01:30 PM
Originally posted by aTourist
I think I accidentally made a DM-SubstractedCube-Wireframe.ut2 once, would that do?

I think it would be fine... ...looking forward to see your two games on the shelves.

legacy-1Dean Avanti
08-05-2005, 08:37 PM
Originally posted by fuegerstef
THe problem is, they don'T license it to everyone.

You have to have experience in the game industry or at least show that you can do good stuff with it. (This info is also 12 months old, don't know if they had changed it)


So you have to do a DM-Substracted CubewithblurredTextures-1338-clanedition-105-ut2 map first

what a funny idea, i think putting the money on the table will be the only thing they require.

fuegerstef
08-06-2005, 07:40 AM
Originally posted by 1Dean Avanti
what a funny idea, i think putting the money on the table will be the only thing they require.


From the Unrealtechnology site:


We license the Unreal Engine to experienced professional game developers.

<snip>

If you're an experienced professional game developer and you're interested in finding out more about licensing the Unreal Engine, please contact us at an email adress for more information.

Hsoolien
08-06-2005, 11:59 AM
Basiclly it comes down to image, every game made on the Unreal Engine is an ad for what the game can do to other developers, so they want to guarentee a certain level of product qulity that it does not reflect badly on them

legacy-1Dean Avanti
08-06-2005, 03:58 PM
actually their may be a little bit of truth about We licence the Unreal Engine to experienced professional game developers only.

In the past if you wanted to licence -- in the UK you was referred to Rage software based in Liverpool, things were very open and you could discus on the phone any matter you had, since then I notice Epic don't use a another party for this purpose, as I remember Rage eventually went bust, it was quite a large company in the UK and it even made the UK TV news, cant remember if it was regional or national news but I remember being suprised at what was a very successful company go down.

I notice things are a little different now, a few months back i mailed epic about liecence details and didn't get a repnonce though i did also ask a stupid question that would of made me appear very raw, so perhaps that was the reason, or perhaps because I wasn't signed by a publisher. of course epic have had some good fortune and had a lot of sign ups so unlike the past when business was a little slacker perhaps this explains the change in policy, though put things this way, you wave that kind of money under someones snout and things will start moving, if you licence unreal engine 3 they insist on it being across 3 platforms so you have to liecence 3 times so thats a minimum of 1 million, you'll get a reponce pronto, trust me.

I have noticed that the ignoring of mails is quite a trend in the game industry, if a publisher is interested in you they are very polite and all communication is enthusiastic and friendly, if they are not interested they dont say no, they just go silent you don't get a response at all, its all or nothing. perhaps they are just edging there bets, I've heard of this in the film industry as well, people don't say no, they just don't call, must be the same business plan, i guess it saves burning bridges and having to do a U turn.

I wonder if developers should take the same stance, if you get a better publishing deal you don't tell the other publisher you just don't return their communication, or if a publisher with an internal studio is developing a game and is overstretched and the want to contract you to work on it, if you are busy don't send a polite no, just ignore the mail completely.
Perhaps its the golden rule, He who has the gold makes the rules perhaps?

AnubanUT2
08-06-2005, 06:53 PM
Well let me chime in on this topic since I have it from Mark Rein himself that is around 2 mill. How do I know this .. well at the GDC in SF I asked him after the UE3 demo and he said if you have 2 million we can talk. Now I don't think that at this price they are worried too much about a quality product ... they win in any event. If a dev pays that much and they screw up why would Epic care? They have the 2 mill and they already have such a fantastic rep ... a dev who uses their engine poorly won't be of concern to them. Not with so many other companies licensing that have solid reps and are showing great games already (not too mention Gears of War ... there is not a better looking game that uses the UE3 tech ... maybe UT2K7, so really Epic isn't too concerened - I don't think - with showing the power of the new engine and winning further awards and selling more licenses).

Bottom line ... if you are willing to give them that much they'll take it. Then the rest is up to the dev. Who isn't going to make a good game with so much just invested in the engine itself and what Dev house that is not somewhat good could or would be willing to pay that much? Still it would be nice to get final clarification from Epic ... and I am sure they will make it clearer it due time.

legacy-FireStorm2KO
08-07-2005, 01:11 PM
Originally posted by 1Dean Avanti
actually their may be a little bit of truth about We licence the Unreal Engine to experienced professional game developers only.

In the past if you wanted to licence -- in the UK you was referred to Rage software based in Liverpool, things were very open and you could discus on the phone any matter you had, since then I notice Epic don't use a another party for this purpose, as I remember Rage eventually went bust, it was quite a large company in the UK and it even made the UK TV news, cant remember if it was regional or national news but I remember being suprised at what was a very successful company go down.

I notice things are a little different now, a few months back i mailed epic about liecence details and didn't get a repnonce though i did also ask a stupid question that would of made me appear very raw, so perhaps that was the reason, or perhaps because I wasn't signed by a publisher. of course epic have had some good fortune and had a lot of sign ups so unlike the past when business was a little slacker perhaps this explains the change in policy, though put things this way, you wave that kind of money under someones snout and things will start moving, if you licence unreal engine 3 they insist on it being across 3 platforms so you have to liecence 3 times so thats a minimum of 1 million, you'll get a reponce pronto, trust me.

I have noticed that the ignoring of mails is quite a trend in the game industry, if a publisher is interested in you they are very polite and all communication is enthusiastic and friendly, if they are not interested they dont say no, they just go silent you don't get a response at all, its all or nothing. perhaps they are just edging there bets, I've heard of this in the film industry as well, people don't say no, they just don't call, must be the same business plan, i guess it saves burning bridges and having to do a U turn.

I wonder if developers should take the same stance, if you get a better publishing deal you don't tell the other publisher you just don't return their communication, or if a publisher with an internal studio is developing a game and is overstretched and the want to contract you to work on it, if you are busy don't send a polite no, just ignore the mail completely.
Perhaps its the golden rule, He who has the gold makes the rules perhaps?

I like the way you think, but not sending backa no probably saves time as they don't have to write a polite rejection letter. In addition it makes the company look better. They never turned anyone down ;)